The cure for the various troubles that a woman is heir to is simple

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This post is addresed to women. Yes, you read that right: “Addresed” with two d’s and only one s.

I want to tell you today about the cure for “the various troubles that a woman is heir to” as Mrs. Dominic Rodgers of San Francisco, Calif. describes them. You know of what I speak: hot flashes, dizziness, fainting spells, backache, headache, bearing-down pains, nervousness. All are symptoms of irregularity AND female disturbances, but are not beyond relief thanks to Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription.

Dr. R.V. Pierce, you see, is “unusually experienced in the treating of women’s peculiar ailments,” so much so that it cured the aforementioned Mrs. Rodgers. The cure, as evidenced by the photo of Mrs. Dominic (hint, hint, wink, wink, nudge, nudge) Rodgers, is simple: a sex change that is brought out by the taking of Dr. Pierce’s “Golden Medical Discovery.”

Ta da.

Watch the end of this video for examples of how Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription can change you from a woman to a man:

This is Part 10 of “Things You Didn’t Know About Your Local Library”:

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV

Part V

Part VI

Part VII
Part VIII
Part IX

This post has not been evaluated by the FDA and as such shall not be construed as medical advice implied or otherwise.,.

6 responses to “The cure for the various troubles that a woman is heir to is simple

  1. Pingback: BREAKING NEWS: British government to buy $60 million worth of opium from China for consumption in India « An unfinished person (in this unfinished universe)

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  3. “Addresed to women – Addresed with two d’s and only one s.”

    Me: Is he talking of bra sizes ?

  4. Oh, I love these kinds of old ads. And the stuff that these bodiless heads would try to sell readers– everything from miracle cures to baby chicks to corsets for children. Always entertaining.

    • unfinishedrambler

      These also were the days of not many photos: 1913, and ads that posed as articles and no attribution, with a lot of editorializing, presumably by the editor. It is definitely entertaining.