The continuing story of the Red Rock radar(s)

This is the second part of a three-part series about the Red Rock radar facility in northcentral Pennsylvania. The first part can be found here.

Almost 14 years after I wrote the story about the Red Rock radar facility, I decided to write a blog post on one of my other blogs, Unfinished Rambler (which now can be found here on this blog). The only photo I could find online originally was on Flickr, but with this note attached to the photographer’s profile:

“I give no permission to media for reprint. If you use them without written permission, I will not hesitate to sue your ass.”

So I wrote to the photographer and asked for permission to use the photo, because I wanted to be very careful about copyright restrictions, and he granted it to me. After that, we had a conversation back and forth about the radar facility through e-mail. As a result, I learned several interesting things, such as:

  1. “There were four radar domes on the site, and two radars on the mountain across from it, south of Ganoga Lake.”
  2. “From 1951 to 1975 it was operated by the 648th Radar Squadron for the purpose of Air Defense and Missile Detection. There were two CPS-6B radars, two FPS-26A radars, and two FPS-35 long-range radars.”

Ironically about a week after he granted me permission to use his photo, Flickr took down the photo for some reason. However, he did point me to some other photos that he thought were in the public domain that I could use. Believing him, I used them until…

…I received an e-mail from Tom Page, cofounder and historian of The Online Air-Defense Radar Museum who informed me that:

Interesting — All three photos came from our website, The Online Air-Defense Radar Museum, http://www.radomes.org/museum/. Our material is copyrighted, and may be used only with permission and with a properly credit to the source. Please add a proper credit line, or remove the photos. We prefer the former, as we want to share the history with as wide an audience as possible. Thank you.

Here are the three photos with the proper credit lines:

Photo courtesy of The Online Air Defense Radar Museum, Radomes, Inc. Used by permission.

Photo courtesy of The Online Air Defense Radar Museum, Radomes, Inc. Used by permission.

Photo courtesy of The Online Air Defense Radar Museum, Radomes, Inc. Used by permission.

Tomorrow, I conclude this series with what Mr. Page told me in a conversation we had back and forth about the radar facility through e-mail.